Associata Catharsis- Adoption Advocacy

The President of Romania has sent a signed decree to parliament promoting some changes to the adoption law. adopției.

The adoption law, although said to be “new”, is in fact the “old” law with some minor changes. But the lack of transparency and the discriminatory nature of the law currently in force has not been changed. That law, nr.273/2004 has been very slightly modified three times since 2004: in 2009, in 2011, and in 2015. And all of that was due to pressures from society as a whole.

The modifications made by the National Authority for the Protection of the Rights of the Child and for Adoption have not really modified anything substantive, including adjustments made in April of 2015. Those adjustments really did nothing in favor of the children who find themselves “imprisoned” [apart from a permanent family] since the day that they were born.

There is really noevident hope for a permanent family for more than 23,000 institutionalized children in approximately 1500 placement centers. The new legislation really does not offer them one bit of hope.

The modifications do NOT foresee a way to truly reduce the number of institutionalized children, but rather foresees only a reduction in the time frame of adoption and also a leave time for parents to get to know the adopted child.
The modifications also allow for a subsidy of 1700 lei per month (about $425) for a time period of 1 year for one of the parents who adopt a child over the age of two years. And that’s about it.

The law continues to discriminate against children for whom a family in Romania or for whom a Romanian family cannot be found. Usually this has to do with the health of the child, the child’s ethnicity, and/or the child’s age.

The adoption law also continues to discriminate against Romanian families and non-Romanian families who live in countries that are signatories to the Hague Convention. The adoption law currently requires either Romanian citizenship, or the establishment/reestablishment of residence in Romania, i.e., to live continually in the country/territory of Romania in order to receive the evaluations and attestations necessary to adopt.

The adoption law does NOT in any way guarantee every child’s right, and particularly the right of abandoned children, to a permanent family in which to grow up.

We will protest these injustices even in the streets of Romania, and we will militate for the rights of these children.

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Asociatia Catharsis Brasov- Registered Adoption Agency.

Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) in Brasov, Romania.

From 15 to 29 July this year, together with the Directorate-General for social assistance and the protection of the rights of the child, we organised the third course of this year, to prepare families who want to adopt a child. We are glad that other 13 families of brașoveans are prepared to receive a baby from romanians in their lives.

For three weeks, the participants received detailed information about abandoned children, about abandonment issues, about the biological family, and in particular about the role of foster foster family. This time, I put the emphasis on children with hard profiles and their needs.

The theme, well-structured in three sessions, was supported by an interdisciplinary team composed of Alina Bedelean, Cathy Ross and ioana lepădatu, clementina trofin and silvia tișcă – social workers, Eva Pirvan-Szekely, lawyer. I also invited the adoptive parents, who opened their soul and shared the learners aspects of their experience.

At the same time as the theoretical knowledge of the role of a parent, which lasts three weeks, the psychological and social evaluation is also done. All these procedures take 90 days, after which the cursanții will receive the family attestation fit to adopt one or more children.
Currently in brasov, more than 100 families want to adopt a child and their number is increasing. We hope so that our efforts to provide a family of their own and permanent to an eligible child will contribute to the higher interest of abandoned children, to say mommy… Daddy… Home…

The training, and development of parental capacities this year are financially supported by our traditional partner, onlus Oikos Italia, President, Don Eugenio Battaglia.

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Asociatia Catharsis Brasov

Asociatia Catharsis Brasov

As of January 2005, when the current adoption law came into force, the number of national adoptions dropped sharply from 1.422 in 2004 to 313 in 2016, and the number of international adoptions dropped from 251 in 2004 to 2 in 2006, one in 2007, 8,, 10, 11, 12, 12 At the same time, it increased the number of abandoned children from 44.000 in 2004 to 70.000 in 2010. Irony. Although it increased the number of families qualified to adopt one or more children, there were very few national adoptions. It also increased the interest of romanians established abroad for adoption of a child. But adoption law allowed international adoption only to grandparents residing abroad. That’s just so they don’t make international adoptions! No grandfather has ever adopted an abandoned nephew, not even in Romania. In addition, adoption sets between the child and the foster family, an affectionate connection, while between grandpa and child there is already a blood link. We’ve managed, hard, very hard to replace grandparents with third-degree relatives, then four and the result of adoption was still zero. Hard, unimaginably hard to obtain the right of romanians abroad for adoption. We had to fight the legislature, because the number of romanians residing abroad was always growing. And I did. Children’s drama harassed by foster homes after growing up in foster families and the statistical data provided by the Romanian media gave us the courage to start the adoption crusade. And we’ve managed with other ngos to amend three times the articles that have made the national adoption difficult, but we haven’t yet here the international adoption-only chance for sick children in an adoption family. Still no international adoptions. The Romanian state still prefers institutionalisation instead of the foster family. The adoption law still humiliates romanians who make extraordinary efforts to adopt a child. Of the total 57.581 children, only 3250 are adoption. And 5 children were adopted international last year, although it was adoption 534. The adoption law humiliates families of romanians in the country and abroad who want to adopt, destroy dreams and kill hope. For impossible reasons, adoption law makes the lives of romanians who want to adopt the future of abandoned children. Romanian abroad are required by law, article 3, to leave her husband alone at home, to give up work and income and a comfortable life with her husband, whether it is all romanian or foreign .. The future mothers were bound by the law of adoption to live effectively and continuously 12 months in Romania, before submitting the adoption request. Many ladies got sick, depressed and gave up. The loser was the kid, and the family, and the state, but nobody cares! I asked for the repeal of article 3 that provides such nonsense. Instead of being repealed, this article has been amended, reduce to 6 months in the territory of Romania… Crazy… and a lot of other bullshit calls for adoption law three times in the last 8 years. For example: Romanians are obliged to make a statement that they have lived effectively and continuously in Romania, before submitting their adoption application!!! Another 90 days, three months, must stay in the country to Participate in the parenting class, the evaluation procedures. After, he has to stay a while to sign the psycho-Social Evaluation Report, the last document required to get the statement. Then get the certificate. And there goes the year. After obtaining the statement, families are registered in the national adoption registry, after which, there is a very long wait, which sometimes leads to even quitting. What sadness, such disappointment, only the Romans know. And all that while tens of thousands of abandoned children want a family.

Child Abuse in Romania

Home / SOCIETY & PEOPLE / SOCIAL / 771 children died during 1966-1990 in the Romanian foster homes, IICCMER says
foster homes

771 children died during 1966-1990 in the Romanian foster homes, IICCMER.

The Institute for the Investigation of Communist Crimes and the Memory of Romanian Exile (IICCMER) has filed a denunciation to the Prosecutor’s Office for inhuman maltreatment over children admitted to foster homes during the communist regime in Romania. The case mainly refers to the sick or disabled children who used to be admitted in the hospital foster homes in Cighid, Pastraveni and Sighetu Marmatiei.

According to IICCMER for Gândul online daily, a total of 771 children died in there during 1966-1990, most of them due to medical causes that could have been prevented or treated. The IICCMER experts and legists say the cases revealed that children were submitted to inhuman treatments and aggressions. Overall, there were over 10,000 such victims in the communist foster homes.

These children used to be considered irrecoverable from the medical point of view, suffering severe handicaps, but many of them were orphans or abandoned by their parents and reached those centers without having serious diseases, IICCMER says.

One of these children abandoned in the foster home in Sighetu Marmatiei was Izidor Ruckel, now aged 37. He escaped the center after he has been adopted by an American family, right after 1990. He told his tragic story to the IICCMER experts.

They used to beat me and another boy with a broomstick so badly that I thought I was going to die. They used to sedate us, they kept us isolated,” Izidor recounted, as quoted by Gândul.

57,581 Children Abandoned in Romania.

3,436 adoptable children recorded in Adoption Register at March-endBY 

A total of 3,436 adoptable children were registered in the National Register for Adoption, at the end of March 2016, of whom 3,069 (89.32 percent) benefited from special protection measures in family type services and 367 (10.68 percent) benefited of special protection measures in residential type services, according to the statistics published by the Ministry of Labor, Family, Social Protection and Elderly People.

Also on 31 March 2016 there were 57,581 children in the adoption system with special protection, out of which 20,156 children (35 percent) benefited from special protection measures in residential type services (16,224 children in public residential type services, 3,932 children in private residential type services) and a number of 37,425 children (65 percent) benefited from special protection measures in family type services (18,815 children were in fostercare, 14,158 children were in the care of relatives up to grade IV included and 4,452 children were in the care of other families or persons.

The representatives of the Labor Ministry signals that, starting 1 January 2005, public services of social assistance created inside the city councils are the main in charge with the growth, which on 31 March 2016 offered services for 42.83 percent of the children that benefit from this sort of services, the accredited private bodies provide services for 19.65 percent and 37.52 percent are beneficiaries of prevention services provided by the Directorate General for Social Assistance and Child Protection.

On 31 March 2016 there were 1,135 public residential type services and 342 residential type services of accredited private bodies. These services include: classic or modular orphanages, apartments, family type houses, maternal centers, emergency reception centers, other services (the service for the development of independent life, day and night shelter).

From the total of 1,477 residential services, a number of 352 (public residential type services and and private residential services) were designed for children with disabilities. The number of children that benefited from a special protection measure in these services provided for children with disabilities was, at the end of March, 6,586 children, recording a decrease of 705 children compared to the same period of 2015.

On 31 March 2016, the Directorates for Social Assistance and Child Protection in every county/sector of Bucharest, the “Child Protection” departments counted 32,655 employees, 31 people more towards the end of the first quarter of last year, and 51 people more versus 31 December 2015.

In the total of 32,655 employees, 4,439 (13.59 percent) were hired in the DGASPC’s own structures, 12,016 (36.80 percent) were fostercare professionals, 12,398 (37.97 percent) were employed in residential type services and 3,802 (11.64 percent) were hired in daytime care services.

Romania- Ethical Adoptions

N.A.C.P.A. – National Authority For Child Protection and Adoption.

Amendments to Romania’s adoption legislation, specifically Law nr237/204, finalised early in 2015, appear from the following graphs, to have resulted in a significant increase in the number of children declared available for domestic and international adoption. The changes were designed to simplify the adoption process for prospective adoptive parents and the process by which a child is considered to be in need of being adopted.

June-2016

Of the 3,734,667 copii living in Romania, 57,581 were living in the child protection system, either in institutions or in private foster care.

3,250 of these copii were declared able to be adopted. Of these, 2,716 were declared able to be adopted domestically and the remaining 534 were declared able to be adopted internationally. screen-shot-2016-09-15-at-10-13-58-amscreen-shot-2016-09-15-at-10-12-59-am

UNICEF in Romania- Minimum Package of Social Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Minimum Package of Social Services for children and their families currently being implemented by UNICEF.

BUCHAREST, 1 July 2016 – Today, on 1 July, Mr. Dragoș Pîslaru, Minister of Labour, Family, Social Protection and the Elderly, and Ms. Gabriela Coman, President of the National Authority for the Protection of Child Rights and Adoption, together with UNICEF Romania representatives visited Lipova and Colonești communities of Bacău county to learn about the implementation of The Minimum Package of Services for children and their families, a UNICEF model intervention, and whether such services could be scaled up nationally.

Concretely, this package consists of community-based services in health, social protection and education. It is universal, as every family can access it, but it focuses on the most vulnerable children and their families.

The Minimum Package of Services also includes a strong prevention component. It requires the presence in each community of at least a social worker, a community nurse and a school counsellor. Together they help vulnerable children and their families to assess their needs and to provide tailored support. For best results, these three professionals closely collaborate and work with local stakeholders such as the mayoralty, NGOs and other community partners.

“Integrated community-based services are a cross-ministry priority action for the current Government, part of the Integrated Package of Measures Against Poverty and of the National Strategy for Social Inclusion and Poverty Reduction. This action is designed with and for community people, aiming to prevent and mitigate the set of vulnerabilities encountered at individual, family and community level. We wish to ensure that the implementation process is founded on an accurate understanding of the concrete real life problems people face locally – which is why we seek to learn from similar models already developed. The UNICEF intervention model and the AURORA software application are an excellent starting point. We are happy to be here today among the people of Lipova and Colonești, in Bacău county, and to have the opportunity to understand how this model works for them and how it could be scaled up nationwide, for all marginalized communities. We are on the field visit today together with representatives of five ministries, as well as Mr. Sorin Brașoveanu, President of Bacău County Council”, said Minister Dragoș Pîslaru.

The representatives of the central and county authorities present at the event in Bacău discussed with local authorities, professionals, as well as several families about how specifically the Minimum Package of Services improved the lives of vulnerable children – from easier access to health care services and first-time school registration, to obtaining birth or disability certificates. Discussions also underlined the challenges related to the implementation of these services locally, particularly in the disadvantaged rural areas.

UNICEF values the Government commitment to ensure that all vulnerable groups receive an integrated package of social services which brings together the social protection, health and education sectors. We hope that our experience in developing and testing such services for children and their families serves as a source of good practices, methods and tools that can be adopted at national level. UNICEF is prepared to support the Government efforts towards scaling up integrated services nationwide”, said Sandie Blanchet, UNICEF Representative in Romania.

A 5.3 million Euro budget is allocated for the implementation of the Minimum Package of Services which is part of the intervention model “Social inclusion through the provision of integrated services at community level” – Community-based Services for Children, an initiative funded by Norway Grants (3.3 million Euro) and UNICEF own funds (2 million Euros).

Through the model tested in the 45 communities in Bacău, UNICEF Romania helps 53,000 children, including by providing social and health care services to 19,000 children and ensuring access to quality inclusive education for 21,000 children.

At the same time, the public policies, norms and standards to be developed based on the lessons learnt in the implementation of this model will support 4 million children in Romania and their families.

Joining the two visiting officials in Bacău were the president of Bacău County Council, Mr. Sorin Brașoveanu, as well as representatives of the Prime Minister’s Office, the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Health and the Ministry of European Funds.

 

Hope for Institutionalised Children; Adoption Support

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The Romanian Prime Minister, Dacian Colios, pays tribute to the dedicated work of ” Hope and Homes for Children”.

He says that there are still 57,000 children not in their families and that the problem of institutionalised care, caused by poverty, is the most critical problem facing the country.

The governments objective is that by 2020, there will no longer be any children in institutions. The government is putting a framework in place to implement new laws to provide families with financial assistance and prevent poverty.

Sunday, 10 April
Prime Minister Dacian Cioloș attended the Hope Concert organized by Hope and Homes for Children Romania Foundation

Address by Prime Minister Dacian Ciolos at the Hope Concert

Dacian Ciolos: Good afternoon. Congratulations, Olga, for the strength you found to continue your way in life despite what people offered you and congratulations to those who found the wisdom, by that time and ever since then, to demonstrate that nothing is irreversible and that along with funds and laws, we can find in us the force and love, and the determination to overcome the most critical moments that this country was confronted with. This issue of institutionalized children was and is one of the critical problems our country is confronted with, and this is why, we should demonstrate that we are able to solve it, and find a resolution for it through ourselves and not just pushed by those outside. Congratulations “Hope and Homes for Children”, for what they achieved and those who helped us that way, but, first of all, we should find the determination in ourselves. I am sure that this problem of institutionalized children is like a test for us, so that we can demonstrate that beyond the love we can find for the one close to us, the family, we can find love to take our children home, as these are our children, are the children of the country, and the way in which we are able to care for them and help them find their way in life, proves that each of us is able to give this country and this nation a path as we want and we wanted it back then, in December 1989. Romania started in 1990 with 100,000 institutionalized children in over 700 centers and, slowly, things have changed. Unfortunately, today, we still have 57,000 children who, in one way or another, are not in their families; for much of them, solutions were found in other families or are cared for by social workers or are in centers that are more welcoming, but the problem still is not resolved. And that’s why I want to tell you that the objective that we take as a state – and here I speak for the government – and I am convinced that this objective will be fully met, regardless of who will be prime minister or the Government that will be in office. The objective we have set is that in 2020, we no longer have children in institutionalized centers. Those 8,000 children Mr. Dărăbuş was talking about – to be able to take them into families and to find them a place to find love around them, to find the wisdom of caregivers so as these children are able to find a way in life. But this is not enough. It is important to have the strength and wisdom to stop the bleeding, so that other children do not add to those whom we wish to see in families, and see them with a purpose in life. These are the two objectives that we meet through this package of measures against poverty which the Government released, and that bring together more financial resources from various sources, several measures, in order to create a safety net for those most vulnerable among us, to be able to overcome difficult times in different stages of life, to reach to be able to go to kindergarten, to be able to go to school despite the difficulties that some families may face and then, they should find a job, find housing. Therefore I wanted to put various measures – which were disparate and were treated coldly, institutionally – in a package for those people determined to find solutions, and who will also have the instrument for it, as many times, we have laws that can be good, we have money, but we do not find the structure, the framework whereby all these put together meet with the determined people, who are able to use these instruments so that we avoid reaching such problems, or to resolve emerging problems. Other objective that we meet is that over the next months, we find solution that these measures that the state makes available, can benefit and be used not only by state institutions –which have already changed, turned by a lot in good, but they still need further development to boost their efficiency, but also non governmental organizations that have demonstrated lately that they know to use these resources efficiently, and that alongside funds and laws, they find love to care for these children. I want to tell everybody who is in this room, representatives of NGOs, that “ yes, we need you”. The state needs you so that we find lasting solutions together for such things not to happen again in Romania and for us to be able, as of 2020 onwards, to look into these children’s eyes and to promise them a future. It is also important to find resources for families in difficulty to receive the support they need to keep their children, because I am sure that no parent wants to abandon their children when he has the means to provide him a future. Therefore, congratulations “Hope and Homes for Children”, congratulations to all who initiated this law and once again, I am leaving from here hoping that we will all find in us the love that would allow us to find solutions to the problems we are facing. Thank you.

Orphan Advocate, Alex Kuch; Journey to Romania.

Alex Kuch, a well known former Romanian orphan, is to meet with Romanian Officials to discuss the Reopening of International Adoptions.

Whangaparoa, March 14, 2015, Former Romanian Orphan Alexander Kuch, a New Zealand well known adoptee will be travelling to Romanian in March. Alex will be speaking to Romanian Officials to discuss the Reopening of International Adoptions, which have been closed since 2003. Additionally he will be engaging in speaking Engagements in Brasov and where everything started for him in his birth town Cluj-Napoca. Alexander Kuch was adopted from Romania by German parents and lived for 12 years in Germany and now for 8 years in New Zealand. Since 2003 International Adoptions have been closed in Romania and since then Alex has been  urging the Romanian Government to Reopen Adoptions. Two years ago he was invited to travel to Romania to speak to the Romanian Government about the reopening of the International Adoptions. The topics that Alex will be addressing in Romania are: What is necessary for that Romania Reopens International Adoptions?   What New Zealand can do to help with the Reopening of International Adoptions and the rest of the International community?  What can be done together to improve the quality of life for a proportion of orphans in certain institutions? Izidor Ruckel, the well-known author (“Abandoned for Life”) and ‘Emmy’ award recipient, who was adopted by American parents in 1991, will also be speaking.” We hope that our testimonies will help not only to reopen the International Adoptions, but also change the terrible conditions in the orphanages, ” said Alex.  Additional Media links of his last trip:  New Zealand Media Interview , His Parliamentary address & News Paper Article Alexander Kuch  A quote by him “I personally believe there is hope for Romania especially for the 70 thousand orphans as hope is only possible in a time of crisis and like in the 1990’s there is hope now” ~ Alexander Kuch ~